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Keyword: white pine blister rust

Conservation of bristlecone pine – proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2017
Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation environments. They are threatened by the non-native disease white pine blister rust, warming temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, and altered disturbance regimes. Sustaining bristlecone pine populations is essential to (1) maintain healthy mountain-top ecosystems and (2) ensure that the young bristlecone pine trees of today and tomorrow have the opportunity to achieve great age with picturesque gnarled trunks and wind-swept canopies for future generations to experience and enjoy.  

Evaluating future success of whitebark pine ecosystem restoration under climate change using simulation modeling

Publications Posted on: August 08, 2017
Major declines of whitebark pine forests throughout western North America from the combined effects of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks, fire exclusion policies, and the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR) have spurred many restoration actions.

Range-wide conservation of Pinus aristata: A genetic collection with ecological context for proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Publications Posted on: May 24, 2017
Tree species are highly vulnerable to anthropogenic environmental change, and are increasingly being challenged by non-native pests and climate change. Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation environments.

Preempting the pathogen: Blister rust and proactive management of high elevation pines

Pages Posted on: May 23, 2017
White pine blister rust has been spreading through western forests since 1910, causing widespread mortality in a group which includes some of the oldest and highest-elevation pines in the U.S. Although the disease cannot be contained, RMRS researchers and collaborators are developing proactive strategies that integrate conservation, ecology, and genetics to prepare ecosystems for invasion of the pathogen.

Preempting the pathogen: Blister rust and proactive management of high-elevation pines

Publications Posted on: April 27, 2017
White pine blister rust has been spreading through western forests since 1910, causing widespread mortality in a group that includes some of the oldest and highest-elevation pines in the United States. The disease has recently reached Colorado and is expected to travel through the southern Rockies.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 9)

Publications Posted on: April 07, 2017
This newsletter is designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as to highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues.

Carbon costs of constitutive and expressed resistance to a non-native pathogen in limber pine

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2016
Increasing the frequency of resistance to the non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola (causative agent of white pine blister rust, WPBR) in limber pine populations is a primary management objective to sustain high-elevation forest communities. However, it is not known to what extent genetic disease resistance is costly to plant growth or carbon economy.

Southern Rockies Rust Resistance Trial (SRRRT)

Projects Posted on: October 24, 2016
The Southern Rockies Rust Resistance Trial (SRRRT) was initiated in 2013 to verify the stability of genetic resistance to white pine blister rust identified during artificial screening tests for limber and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines conducted in collaboration with Dorena Genetic Resource Center (Cottage Grove, OR). Over 700 seedlings were outplanted in the fall 2013 and another 700 seedlings in spring 2014. White pine blister rust is common in the forests in and around the SRRRT site providing a natural source of inoculum to the seedlings. The seedlings will be periodically assessed for signs and symptoms of white pine blister rust over the next 10 years – disease symptoms were first noted in 2016.

Range-wide vulnerability of limber pine: White pine blister rust resistance and climate interactions

Projects Posted on: October 21, 2016
Forest surveys alone cannot predict species vulnerability as they cannot determine if the remaining healthy trees are at risk for disease or if they have heritable genetic resistance to support future populations. This project takes range-wide common garden (198 families) and artificial inoculation with Cronartium ribicola (causal agent of white pine blister rust) in order to better undertand host population vulnerability and sustainability.

The effects of seed source health on whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) regeneration density after wildfire

Publications Posted on: October 07, 2016
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) populations are declining nearly rangewide from a combination of factors, including mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902) outbreaks, the exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch. 1872, which causes the disease white pine blister rust, and successional replacement due to historical fire exclusion practices.

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