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Keyword: wildland shrubs

Predicting first-year bare-root seedling establishment with soil and community dominance factors

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
The usefulness of measuring community dominance factors and the soil parameters of geometric mean particle size and percent fines as predictors of first-year bare-root establishment of Wyoming big sagebrush seedlings was investigated. The study was conducted on six sandy soils in south-central Washington.

Winterfat decline and halogeton spread in the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) is a long-lived shrub with excellent drought tolerance and good to moderate tolerance for herbivory. It often occurs as near monocultures in deep finetextured soils of alluvial fans and valley bottoms. Winterfat communities are second only to those of shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) in dominance of the 16 million ha of salt-desert shrublands found in Western North America.

Response of residual native species after two-way chaining and seeding in Utah

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Pinyon-juniper woodlands have dramatically increased in both tree density and distribution over the last 150 years. This change led to depleted native herbaceous understory in pinyon-juniper woodlands. One method to increase herbaceous understory is to remove the trees and aerially seed. The objective of this study was to determine how variations of seed mixes used in past revegetation projects have affected residual native species.

Plant community dynamics of burned and unburned sagebrush and pinyon-juniper vegetation in West-Central Utah

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Fire ecology of sagebrush and pinyon-juniper vegetation in the Great Basin has been influenced by human disturbances and exotic plant introductions. Late-seral woody vegetation, which increased following Euro-American settlement, is now decreasing because of wildfire and exotic annuals. Multiple successional pathways following fire have been observed in these vegetation types.

Vegetation response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the Larrea-Ambrosia and Coleogyne shrublands

Publications Posted on: September 18, 2013
Vegetation response to various types of disturbances was quantitatively investigated in the Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa (creosote bush-white bursage) and Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) shrublands of southern Nevada. Between the two control (undisturbed) habitats, the Larrea-Ambrosia vegetation zone had a greater plant species richness, but had a lower percent vegetation cover than the Coleogyne zone.

Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-mainland relationship, dispersal mechanisms, and species turnover.

Components of spatial and temporal soil variation at Canyonlands National Park: Implications for P dynamics and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) performance

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
From January 1997 through October 1998, research was conducted at Canyonlands National Park to investigate soil traits responsible for distinct spatial patterns of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) occurrence. Field experiments were conducted at sites representing a broad range of soil conditions and cheatgrass abundances.

What makes the desert bloom? Contribution of dust and crusts to soil fertility on the Colorado Plateau

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
Eolian dust (windblown silt and clay) and biological soil crusts are both important to ecosystem functioning of arid lands. Dust furnishes essential nutrients, influences hydrology, contributes to soil formation, and renders surfaces vulnerable to erosion. Biological soil crusts contribute directly to soil fertility by fixing carbon and nitrogen, and indirectly by trapping newly-deposited dust and stabilizing already-present soil.

New plant releases from the USDA-NRCS Aberdeen, Idaho, Plant Materials Center

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
The Plant Materials Center at Aberdeen, Idaho, is operated by the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. The purpose of the Plant Materials Center is to evaluate and release plant materials for conservation use and to develop and transfer new technology for the establishment and management of plants. The Center serves portions of Nevada, Utah, California, Oregon and Idaho.

Ecological and population genetics of locally rare plants: A review

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2013
Plant species with limited dispersal ability, narrow geographical and physiological tolerance ranges, as well as with specific habitat and ecological requirements are likely to be rare. Small and isolated populations and species contain low levels of within-population genetic variation in many plant species. The gene pool of plants is a product of phenotype-environment interaction.

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