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Keyword: yellow toadflax

Using invaded-range species distribution modeling to estimate the potential distribution of Linaria species and their hybrids in the U.S. northern Rockies

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Invasive populations of Dalmation toadflax [Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill.] and yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris Mill.) are widespread throughout the Intermountain West, where gene flow between these nonnative species is producing vigorous and fertile hybrids. These hybrid toadflax populations are less responsive to herbicides than either parent species, and biocontrol agents routinely released on L. dalmatica and L.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 11)

Publications Posted on: June 10, 2019
In this issue, we cover new research ranging from using chili powder to improve native plant restoration, searching for a link between exotic white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle resistance in limber pine, identifying how melting arctic sea ice could open new pathways for invasive species introductions, and research into a relatively newly established biocontrol agent for rush skeletonweed.

Invasive Species Science Update (No. 10)

Publications Posted on: April 26, 2018
In this issue, we cover new research on wide-ranging topics from the longterm effects of drought on competition between native and invasive plant species, to the effects of drought on pollinator visitation to invasive plants, to a novel use of insect pheromones to improve biocontrol of invasive saltcedar.

Toadflax stem miners and gallers: The original weed whackers

Pages Posted on: April 12, 2018
Dalmatian and yellow toadflax are aesthetically pleasing weeds wreaking havoc in rangelands across the western United States. These non-native forbs spread rapidly into fields following fire, tilling, construction, or other disturbances. They are successful and stubborn invaders, producing massive quantities of seeds each year and rapidly re-sprouting from root fragments. Eight non-native toadflax feeding insect species have been intentionally released or accidentally introduced in North America. Stem mining weevils, Mecinus spp., serve as particularly powerful "weed whackers" against toadflax. Biological control of toadflax is complicated by the existence of two Mecinus species - each of which performs better on different toadflax species - and the appearance of competitively superior hybrids of yellow and Dalmatian toadflax. Cooperation between researchers and managers continues to improve the effectiveness of biocontrol and make headway against weedy invaders.

Hybridization between Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Media Gallery Posted on: May 12, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax and yellow toadflax, have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds.

Looks aren’t everything: Hybridization between dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria Dalmatica) and yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds. Herbicide and biological control treatments for invasive Linaria are highly species-specific, necessitating the development of a molecular diagnostic tool to accurately confirm when cryptic hybridization has spontaneously occurred in the field, and habitat suitability modeling to predict areas most vulnerable to hybrid invasion.

Biology and biological control of Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2016
Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill., and yellow toadflax, Linaria vulgaris Mill., are exotic weeds of rangeland, grassland, forests, and cropland. Both Dalmatian and yellow toadflax are short-lived perennial forbs that are easily recognized by their yellow snapdragon- like flowers (Figure 1a, 1b).

The ‘dirt napping’ stem miner: Potential for classical biocontrol of yellow and hybrid toadflax

Projects Posted on: May 11, 2015
Optimizing classical biological control through the deployment of environmentally resilient agents may provide a sustainable, cost-effective and selective management option for large scale infestations of fire adapted weeds. Ongoing research is exploring the efficacy of a candidate agent, the stem mining weevil Mecinus heydenii, for biocontrol for invasive toadflax.

Potential impacts of carbon dioxide on invasive toadflax

Media Gallery Posted on: April 28, 2015
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds.

Science You Can Use Bulletin: Toadflax stem miners and gallers: The original weed whackers

Publications Posted on: March 04, 2015
Dalmatian and yellow toadflax are aesthetically pleasing weeds wreaking havoc in rangelands across the western United States. These non-native forbs spread rapidly into fields following fire, tilling, construction, or other disturbances. They are successful and stubborn invaders, producing massive quantities of seeds each year and rapidly re-sprouting from root fragments.

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