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News Releases

Frank McCormick, Research Program Manager of the Air, Water and Aquatic Environments science program in the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS), has been elected President of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH). The ASIH, with about 2,500 members, is the leading scient
On July 2, U.S. Forest Service-Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) research landscape ecologist Dr. Sean Parks was honored with the 2019 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his research related to wildfire science. The Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers who are beginning their...
The Forest Service has developed a new cross-boundary assessment tool that maps 240 million acres where significant wildfire ignitions can potentially impact over 1,800 Western communities. This new framework is described in the report Cross-boundary Wildfire and Community Exposure Assessment (RMRS-General Technical Report-392), which was recently released by the USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and Oregon State University.
* News release issued by the International Institute of Tropical Forestry
An unprecedented conservation effort is underway across 11 Western states to address threats to sagebrush ecosystems and the many species that depend on them. Today, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior released the Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome (Part 2). The Science Framework provides a transparent, ecologically responsible approach for making policy and management decisions...
* News release issued by the American Geophysical Union
The Arapahoe snowfly was something of an enigma. This small stonefly, an aquatic insect important to trout and familiar to trout anglers, was thought to be rare and found only in a small area of northern Colorado. This limited presence earned it a Candidate species status under the Endangered Species Act and protections as a Sensitive Species on Forest Service lands. Researchers recently found that the Arapahoe snowfly is actually not a distinct...
An innovative new project has discovered that animal footprints contain enough DNA to allow for species identification. Scientists have traditionally relied on snow-tracks and camera traps to monitor populations of rare carnivores, like Canada lynx, fishers and wolverines. These traditional techniques can tell part of, but not the entire story of an animal population, and are sometimes difficult to validate species identification. 
Land managers need cost-effective unbiased monitoring and assessments of current rangeland conditions and past vegetation performance in order to improve rangeland management. 
Do severe wildfires impact rivers and reservoirs years after they burn? In Colorado, at the site of the 2002 Hayman Fire, a new study found that watersheds with extensive high-severity wildfire still contained elevated levels of streamwater nitrogen. While elevated nitrogen and carbon in burned watersheds are not a threat to drinking water quality, they do exceed expected levels for healthy streams in this area. 

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