You are here

Jim J. Reardon

Forester/Ecologist

Address: 
5775 Highway 10 West
Missoula, MT 59808
Phone: 
406-329-4849
Contact Jim J. Reardon

Current Research

I am currently working on :1)Smoldering Combustion limits of Organic soils in pocosin shrub communities in North Carolina 2)Live and dead fuel moisture dynamics in grassland communities in Montana 3) Smoke emissions from prescribed burning in the southeastern USA

Research Interests

My research interests are focused on: 1) Soil heating and smoldering combustion processes 2) development of real time instrumentation to provide measurements of fuel and soil properties that to improve our decision making process

Past Research

The significance of smoldering combustion of organic soils is of increasing significant due to concerns about climate change and an increasing an awareness of public health issues regarding emissions from wildfires and prescribed burning. An improved understanding of the factors that influence the consumption of organic soils will improve our ability to anticipate and hopefully mitigate some of the effects of burning.

Why This Research is Important

The projects I have worked on in the past include:1)The development and testing of a soil heating model2)The effects of soil heating that result from from wild fire and prescribed burning. The studies have included soil nutrients,cultural artifacts and pallentological resources. 3) Soil heating associated with the in_situ burning of oil spills.

Education

  • Rutgers University, B.S., Foresrty/Soils, 1978
  • Featured Publications

    Publications

    Akagi, Sheryl K.; Burling, Ian R.; Mendoza, A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Cameron, M.; Griffith, David W. T.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, David R.; Reardon, Jim J.; Yokelson, Robert J., 2014. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern US pine forests using an open-path FTIR system
    Johnson, T.J.; Yokelson, R.J.; Akagi, S.K.; Burling, I.R.; Weise, D.R.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Stockwell, C.E.; Reardon, Jim J.; Lincoln, Emily N.; Profeta, L.T.M.; Mendoza, A.; Schneider, M.D.W.; Sams, R.L.; Williams, S.D.; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, D.W.T.; Cameron, M.; Gilman, J.B.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J.M.; Veres, P.; Kuster, W.C.; de Gouw, J, 2014. Final Report for SERDP Project RC-1649: Advanced Chemical Measurements of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns
    Akagi, Sheryl K.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Weise, David R.; Reardon, Jim J.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Johnson, Timothy J., 2014. First look at smoke emissions from prescribed burns in long-unburned longleaf pine forests
    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, Jim J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker, D. R. III; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R., 2013. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires
    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Reardon, Jim J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R., 2013. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes
    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, Jim J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker III, D. R.; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R., 2012. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires [Discussions]
    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Reardon, Jim J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R., 2012. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes [Discussions]
    Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, Shawn P.; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Reardon, Jim J.; Weise, D. R., 2011. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted by prescribed fires in the United States
    Butler, Bret W.; Jimenez, D.; Forthofer, Jason M.; Sopko, Paul A.; Shannon, K.; Reardon, Jim J., 2010. In-situ characterization of wildland fire behavior
    Keane II, Robert E.; Reinhardt, Elizabeth D.; Scott, Joe; Gray, Kathy; Reardon, Jim J., 2005. Estimating forest canopy bulk density using six indirect methods
    Figure 1 urban_interface_mulching
    Recently, several large fires have burned through masticated sites – including in Colorado (Brewer et al. 2013), Washington, and New Mexico. Burning under extreme weather conditions with strong winds, these fires have challenged the benefits of using mastication, even though mastication can provide many positive environmental effects, such as soil moisture retention and cool, moist environments for soil microbes. However, informing managers when, where, and how mastication is applied is based on antidotal evidence. To address, this issue we synthesized information to provide managers with a current state of knowledge on mastication.
    Post-fire resiliency of plant communities in northern mixed-grass prairie and eastern sagebrush steppe depends largely on plant regeneration from aboveground and belowground buds. Canopy and stem regeneration occurs more quickly via the bud bank than via seedling recruitment. To better predict plant community responses to fire, we need an enhanced understanding of the immediate and long-term bud responses of key forb, grass, and shrub species to fire.  
    For the past three years, scientists from the RMRS Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula and the Forestry Sciences Lab in Moscow have been researching mastication as a fuel treatment in the Rocky Mountains. Specifically, they have been interested in how the materials age when they are left on the ground to decompose and how that aging affects their flammability.
    Fuel mastication is becoming the preferred method of fuel treatment in areas where using prescribed fire is an issue. While much is known about mastication effects soils, fire behavior and vegetative response, little is known about how fuel particle and fuel bed characteristics and properties change over time.
    The ArcBurn project uses controlled laboratory experiments and instrumentation on prescribed burns and wildfires to determine critical damage thresholds for cultural resources including archaeological sites, artifacts, and heritage resources. Data and observations on fire effects and effectiveness of fuels treatments are then used to develop guidelines for best treatment practices and protection of archaeological resources.
    Current operational fire behavior models are empirically based on fire spread through surface fuels and do not describe heating and combustion processes. RMRS Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program scientists and collaborators have developed a research program for understanding how fire spread occurs with a focus on live fuels and active crown fire.
    This study investigates the effects of burning petroleum fuel oil (diesel) and crude oil on soils.

    RMRS Science Program Areas: 
    Fire, Fuel and Smoke