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Regeneration for Resilience framework to support regeneration decisions for species with populations at risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust

Status: 
Planning
Dates: 
February, 2018

White pine blister rust is an invasive fungus that infects and kills high elevation five-needle pines.
White pine blister rust is an invasive fungus that infects and kills high elevation five-needle pines.
The Regeneration for Resilience (R4R) framework provides a decision structure to prioritize limited resources and utilize artificial and natural regeneration management to offer the best likelihood of success in positioning stands and landscapes to support multi-generational self-sustaining host populations in the presence of the nonnative invader. It does this by (1) increasing host population size to offset invader-caused mortality, (2) increasing the frequency of genetic resistance traits in host populations in habitats that enable their expression and durability to retard future mortality and facilitate population sustainability and recovery, and (3) maintain host genetic diversity, adaptive capacity, and population connectivity. The R4R framework is demonstrated for application to high elevation five-needle pine ecosystems of North America, including P. strobiformis, P. aristata, P. flexilis, P. albicaulis, and others that are impacted or threatened by the nonnative pathogen Cronartium ribicola that causes the lethal disease white pine blister rust (WPBR). Examples of using the R4R framework integrate information on current forest condition, WPBR risk or hazard, genetic resistance to WPBR, and host population dynamics and silvics to prioritize areas and design interventions. Effective management of forest regeneration dynamics can increase forest resilience and adaptive capacity to mitigate impacts of invasive species.

Featured Publications

Schoettle A. W., W. R. Jacob, K. M. Waring, K. S. Burns. (in press) Regeneration for Resilience framework to support regeneration decisions for species with populations at risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust. New Forests.

Schoettle. 2018. Disturbance mitigation and recovery - Natural and artificial regeneration to increase resilience of limber pine and bristlecone pine forests. Invited Presention at 2018 Reforestation-SI Workshop for R1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 10 National Forests; February 21, 2018 via Adobe Connect, Missoula, MT.



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Region 3 FHP