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Adapting to the effects of climate change [Chapter 14]

Posted date: May 08, 2018
Publication Year: 
2018
Authors: Halofsky, Jessica E.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Halofsky, Jessica E.; Peterson, David L.; Ho, Joanne J.; Little, Natalie, J.; Joyce, Linda A., eds. Climate change vulnerability and adaptation in the Intermountain Region [Part 2]. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-375. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 404-509.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Adapting to climate change, or adjusting to current or future climate and its effects (Noble et al. 2014), is critical to minimizing the risks associated with climate change impacts. Adaptation actions can vary from passive (e.g., a "wait and see" approach), to relatively simple (e.g., increasing harvest rotation age), to complex (e.g., managing forest structure and processes across large landscapes for a future range of conditions) (Spittlehouse and Stewart 2003). Many adaptation actions are complementary to other land management goals and actions, and most land managers already have the tools and knowledge to start addressing climate change. However, managers may need to make some adjustments, considering new issues, scale and location of implementation, timing, and prioritization of actions (Swanston et al. 2016). For example, it will be increasingly important to prioritize which management actions to take, and where to take those actions, based on the vulnerability of resources to climate change and the likelihood that actions in those places will be effective.

Citation

Halofsky, Jessica E. 2018. Adapting to the effects of climate change [Chapter 14]. In: Halofsky, Jessica E.; Peterson, David L.; Ho, Joanne J.; Little, Natalie, J.; Joyce, Linda A., eds. Climate change vulnerability and adaptation in the Intermountain Region [Part 2]. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-375. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 404-509.