You are here

Changes in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) activities from winter to spring in the greater Yellowstone area

Posted date: June 15, 2016
Publication Year: 
1997
Authors: Squires, John R.; Anderson, Stanley H.
Publication Series: 
Scientific Journal (JRNL)
Source: American Midland Naturalist. 138: 208-214.

Abstract

Trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), in the winter, primarily, slept 42% of the time, fed 30%, swam 12%; and preened 7%. Comparisons of swan activities among die periods during the winter indicated they increased feeding throughout the day into night, when they fed at their highest rate. Swans spent more time sleeping as winter temperatures decreased; feeding mostly ceased when temperatures fell below approximately -17 C. Dominant activities in spring included feeding (45%), sleeping (17%), swimming (13%); and preening (12%). During spring, swans fed at a high rate throughout day and night, suggesting that spring use-areas may be important to swans depositing endogenous reserves before nesting.

Citation

Squires, John R.; Anderson, Stanley H. 1997. Changes in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) activities from winter to spring in the greater Yellowstone area. American Midland Naturalist. 138: 208-214.