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Climate change and the future of seed zones

Posted date: March 24, 2014
Publication Year: 
2013
Authors: Kilkenny, Francis F.; St. Clair, Brad; Horning, Matt
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., technical coordinators. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 87-89.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The use of native plants in wildland restoration is critical to the recovery and health of ecosystems. Information from genecological and reciprocal transplant common garden studies can be used to develop seed transfer guidelines and to predict how plants will respond to future climate change. Tools developed from these data, such as universal response functions and trait shift maps, can help managers make informed decisions regarding restoration strategies, such as assisted migration, in the face of climate change.

Citation

Kilkenny, Francis; St. Clair, Brad; Horning, Matt. 2013. Climate change and the future of seed zones. In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., tech. coord. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 87-89.