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Disturbance ecology of high-elevation five-needle pine ecosystems in western North America

Posted date: June 30, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Campbell, Elizabeth M.; Keane II, Robert E.; Larson, Evan R.; Murray, Michael P.; Schoettle, Anna W.; Wong, Carmen
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 154-163.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

This paper synthesizes existing information about the disturbance ecology of high-elevation five-needle pine ecosystems, describing disturbances regimes, how they are changing or are expected to change, and the implications for ecosystem persistence. As it provides the context for ecosystem conservation/restoration programs, we devote particular attention to wildfire and its interactions with mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreaks and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch.).

Citation

Campbell, Elizabeth M.; Keane, Robert E.; Larson, Evan R.; Murray, Michael P.; Schoettle, Anna W.; Wong, Carmen. 2011. Disturbance ecology of high-elevation five-needle pine ecosystems in western North America. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 154-163.