You are here

A natural history of Cronartium ribicola

Posted date: July 01, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Geils, Brian W.; Vogler, Detlev R.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 210-217.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Cronartium ribicola is a fungal pathogen that causes a blister rust disease of white pines, Ribes, and other hosts in the genera Castilleja and Pedicularis. Although blister rust can damage white pine trees and stands, the severity and significance of these impacts vary with time, place, and management. We use a natural history approach to describe the history, biology, and management of C. ribicola. We review its status as a non-native pathogen, likely ecological and evolutionary behavior, and implications for management.

Citation

Geils, Brian W.; Vogler, Detlev R. 2011. A natural history of Cronartium ribicola. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 210-217.