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A population genetic model for high-elevation five-needle pines: Projecting population outcomes in the presence of white pine blister rust

Posted date: June 30, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Schoettle, Anna W.; Klutsch, J. G.; Antolin, M. F.; Field, S.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 145-146.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The slow growth and long generation time of the five-needle pines have historically enabled these trees to persist on the landscape for centuries, but without sufficient regeneration opportunities these same traits hinder the species' ability to adapt to novel stresses such as the non-native disease white pine blister rust (WPBR). Increasing the frequency of resistance to WPBR is the foundation for options to sustain five-needle pine species in the presence of the pathogen. Depending on the condition of the ecosystems, increasing resistance can be achieved via outplanting resistant seedling stock and/or stimulating natural regeneration (Schoettle and Sniezko 2007). As the objective of management intervention in the high elevation ecosystems is often to promote multiple generations of sustainability, greater understanding of the regeneration cycle and the potential for increasing the frequency of resistance are needed. This is especially critical for the WPBR pathosystem as WPBR kills trees of all ages and therefore impacts multiple stages of the regeneration cycle of five-needle pines.

Citation

Schoettle, A. W.; Klutsch, J. G.; Antolin, M. F.; Field, S. 2011. A population genetic model for high-elevation five-needle pines: Projecting population outcomes in the presence of white pine blister rust. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 145-146.