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Research Papers, Notes and FIA Bulletins

Globally, more carbon is stored in the soil than in any other terrestrial form (Brevik 2013; Woodall et al. 2015). Soil organic carbon (SOC) may contain more than three times the carbon found in the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation combined (Qafoku 2014). Soil organic carbon is derived from soil organic matter (i.e., decomposition of living organisms) and is generally about 58 percent of soil organic matter by weight (Pribyl 2010).
This report presents considerations of potential hazards and mitigation measures associated with conducting field research in the context of a pathogenic epidemic or pandemic situation.
The Wildfire Research Center (WiRe Center) works with wildfire practitioners seeking to create communities that are adapted to wildfire using an evidenced-based approach. Historically, immediate threats and wildfire suppression have garnered much attention and resources. While these efforts remain critical, getting in front of the problem by promoting pathways to fire adaptation is of paramount importance.
A study of commercial timber-harvesting sites in Arizona and New Mexico was conducted from 2012 to 2017 to estimate growing-stock removals, characterize current tree utilization and logging operations, and assist with estimating the amount of woody biomass left on-site after harvesting. Fifty-four sample logging sites were selected within major geographic regions proportional to regional five-year timber harvests.
This Resource Bulletin is part of a series of reports presenting findings from a census of Montana’s primary forest products industry. Part I of this series presents information on the volume of timber harvested in the State in 2014 by product, ownership, species and resource area. It also describes timber flow within the State and across State lines.
This Resource Bulletin is part of a series of reports presenting findings from a census of Montana’s primary forest products industry. Part II of the series presents information on the forest products sectors that processed timber and mill residue into finished products in 2014.
This Resource Bulletin is part of a series of reports presenting findings from a census of Montana’s primary forest products industry. Part III of the series presents information on sales value and employment associated with primary wood products manufacturing, the economic contribution of forest products manufacturing in the State, and an analysis of the broader forest industry and how it has changed over time.
The University of Montana’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER), in conjunction with the Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IW-FIA) Program of the US Forest Service, conducted a census of Montana’s timber processors that operated during calendar year 2014.
Fire exclusion since the 1930s across western U.S. landscapes has greatly altered fire regimes and fuel conditions. After a lightning-caused fire swept through the center of the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in 2003, researchers initiated a comprehensive study along the South Fork of the Flathead River. This study assessed the post-fire survival of over 600 iconic, relict ponderosa pine trees.
The spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis, can cause extensive mortality of Engelmann spruce, Picea engelmannii, during outbreaks. Endemic populations breed in the underside of downed spruces. Outbreaks often develop after blowdowns that create abundant downed trees where beetle populations can increase. Occasionally, managers practice suppression to protect high-value resources.

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