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Research Papers, Notes and FIA Bulletins

Wildfire affects hundreds of wildland-urban interface communities each year, and yet most communities lack data reflecting the conditions before an event. This study was conducted before the devastating 2020 East Troublesome Fire1, which spread across 193,812 acres and resulted in two lives lost and 366 homes and 214 other structures burned.
Over the last decade, a team of researchers and practitioners, referred to as the Wildfire Research Team (WiRē1 Team), has worked with wildfire practitioners seeking to create communities that are adapted to wildfire through an evidenced-based approach. The West Region Wildfire Council (WRWC) has been an integral partner amongst the WiRē Team throughout this time.
Wildfire affects many types of communities and is a particular concern for communities in the wildland urban interface (WUI), such as those of Teton County, Wyoming. The core intent of this project was to provide evidence to support the Teton Area Wildfire Protection Coalition (TAWPC) and affiliated organizations in their wildfire mitigation and education programming.
This report summarizes the most recent Forest Inventory and Analysis data of Nevada’s forests based on field data collected between 2009 and 2018. Many of the results were compared to those from the 2004-2013 evaluation period. Results show that Nevada’s forest land covers 10.6 million acres, most of which (63 percent or 6.7 million acres) are administered by the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management.
Recent increases in area burned, combined with poor natural regeneration in some areas, have promoted concerns about widespread forest losses throughout the western U.S. Postfire reforestation is one strategy commonly employed by land managers and land owners to facilitate forest recovery, but the area in need of planting only becomes larger each year.
Allometric equations are widely used to estimate forest aboveground biomass (AGB). However, their development rarely includes the oldest and largest trees, leading to estimation errors. Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is an early successional nitrogen-fixing tree, native to the Eastern United States.
Land management and fire management goals are increasingly framed in terms of resilience, in part due to the combined impacts of climate change, land-use change, and legacies of land management. Implicit in this framing is the recognition that resilience to wildfire involves both ecological and social dimensions.
The USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) and Intermountain Region (R4) are modeling an approach to how National Forest System management and science can work together in meaningful ways with tangible results. The R4-RMRS Science Partner Program actively cultivates relationships between research scientists and land managers to co-produce new knowledge and land management approaches.
Wildfire affects many types of communities and is a particular concern for communities in the wildland urban interface (WUI), such as Chalk Creek in Chaffee County. The core intent of this project was to provide evidence to support Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) Salida Field Office’s wildfire mitigation and education program.
This report traces the flow of Montana’s 2018 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Montana’s primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production, employment, and sales. objectives.

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