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Territories of Flammulated Owls (Otus flammeolus): is occupancy a measure of habitat quality?

Posted date: August 06, 2008
Publication Year: 
1997
Authors: Linkhart, Brian D.; Reynolds, Richard T.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 250-254.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Annual territory occupancy by Flammulated Owls (Otus flammeolus) in Colorado was evaluated from 1981-1996. Fourteen territories occurred within a 452 ha study area. Each year, three to six territories were occupied by breeding pairs and three to seven were occupied by unpaired males. Territories were occupied by breeding pairs a mean of 5.1 years (not necessarily consecutive) and by unpaired males a mean of 3.9 years (not necessarily consecutive). Territories most consistently occupied by breeding pairs contained the highest percentage of old (200-400 years) ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir, whereas territories least occupied by breeding pairs contained the least amount of this vegetation type.

Citation

Linkhart, Brian D.; Reynolds, Richard T. 1997. Territories of Flammulated Owls (Otus flammeolus): is occupancy a measure of habitat quality?. In: Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 250-254.