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Climate Change

Publications

This paper presents a prototype Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) developed to produce regionally unbiased annual estimates of aboveground biomass (AGB). Our CMS employed a bottom-up, two-step modeling strategy beginning with a spatially and temporally biased sample: project datasets collected and contributed by US Forest Service (USFS) and other forestry stakeholders in 29 different project areas in the northwestern USA.
Globally, more carbon is stored in the soil than in any other terrestrial form (Brevik 2013; Woodall et al. 2015). Soil organic carbon (SOC) may contain more than three times the carbon found in the atmosphere and terrestrial vegetation combined (Qafoku 2014). Soil organic carbon is derived from soil organic matter (i.e., decomposition of living organisms) and is generally about 58 percent of soil organic matter by weight (Pribyl 2010).
The adaptive management of forests and rangelands is directed toward achieving an ecologically sustainable landscape that contributes to social and economic sustainability. This “socioecological resilience” is a significant focus of the U.S.
As described in Chapter 1.1 (Dumroese, this synthesis, The Northeastern California Plateaus Bioregion Science Synthesis: Background, Rationale, and Scope), the Lassen and Modoc National Forests (hereafter the Lassen and the Modoc) share dry pine forestland that was not addressed by two prior science syntheses: Science Synthesis to Support Socioecological Resilience in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Range (hereafter, Sierra Nevada Scien
As described in Chapter 1.1 (Dumroese, this synthesis, The Northeastern California Plateaus Bioregion Science Synthesis: Background, Rationale, and Scope), the Lassen and Modoc National Forests (hereafter the Lassen and the Modoc) share dry pine forestland that was not addressed by two prior science syntheses: Science Synthesis to Support Socioecological Resilience in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascade Range (hereafter, Sierra Nevada Scien
Biological soil crusts (BSCs) develop when various combinations of a vast array of bacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, lichens, terrestrial algae, and mosses occupy the surface and upper few millimeters of the soil (Warren et al. 2019b). Historically, BSCs have been referred to as cryptobiotic, cryptogamic, microbiotic, microfloral, microphytic, and organogenic crusts.
The 2020 RPA Assessment includes climate change as a driver affecting natural resources on forests and rangelands in the United States. This publication describes the process used to select the scenarios, climate models, and climate projections that will be used to project renewable resource conditions 50 years into the future.
Revisions to forest plans, as directed by the U.S.
Climate change is increasing the risk of extreme events, resulting in social and economic challenges. I examined recent past (1971–2000), current and near future (2010-2039), and future (2040-2069) fire and heat hazard combined with population growth by different regions and residential densities (i.e., exurban low and high densities, suburban, and urban low and high densities). Regional values for extreme fire weather days varied greatly.
A central challenge in global change research is the projection of the future behavior of a system based upon past observations. Tree-ring data have been used increasingly over the last decade to project tree growth and forest ecosystem vulnerability under future climate conditions. But how can the response of tree growth to past climate variation predict the future, when the future does not look like the past?

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