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Climate Change

Tools

Having precise estimates of our forest characteristics is important if we want to assess the status of our forests, detect change, or monitor trends. New statistical estimators enable us to improve precision by merging forest inventory data with data from a variety of remote sensing instruments but often pose computational challenges. This new tutorial and R software package, known as mase (model-assisted survey estimation) makes both old and new survey estimation tools easily accessible.
FIRE-BIRD is an ArcGIS spatial tool for applying habitat suitability models to generate maps that inform forest management planning. This tool focuses on disturbance-associated woodpecker species of conservation concern.
How does a land manager make a decision today that will impact landscapes decades into the future? With the uncertain influence of climate change and its associated stressors, it’s an increasingly thorny question. 
The Next Generation Fire Severity Mapping is a tool designed to depict the probability of high-severity fire, if a fire were to occur, for several ecoregions in the contiguous western U.S. Statistical models were used to generate “wall-to-wall” maps for 13 of the 19 ecoregions. 
RMRS Raster Utility is an object oriented coding library that facilitates a wide range of spatial and statistical analysis using our newly developed Function Modeling framework. Our library focuses on significantly reducing processing time and storage space associated with analyzing large datasets and has an easy to use graphical user interface, packaged as an ESRI add-in toolbar.
The SAVS uses an online questionnaire with 22 criteria to predict vulnerability or population response of species to provide a framework for assessing vulnerability to future climate change
NorWeST aggregates stream temperature data from the Northwestern U.S. into a stream temperature database, and uses the data to develop stream temperature models.
Thermal regimes are important to aquatic ecosystems because they strongly dictate species distributions, productivity, and abundance. Inexpensive digital temperature loggers, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing technologies, and new spatial analyses are facilitating the development of temperature models and monitoring networks applicable at broad spatial scales. This web site provides a mapping tool to help those in the western U.S.