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Recreation

Science Spotlights

Cover of the featured publication 'Operationalizing the concepts of resilience and resistance for managing ecosystems and species at risk.' The cover has the title at the top with watercolor painted birds in multiple colors flying across the page.
In this era of rapid global change, managing for ecological resilience can significantly increase our ability to maintain high value resources and ecosystem services. New information on how to apply ecological resilience concepts to natural resources management has recently been complied by USDA Forest Service scientists and their colleagues in an e-book published by Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Examples are provided for variety of...
A tent with a pinata hanging outside.
The Latinx population is the largest minority population in the United States and is estimated to comprise 28% of the U.S. population by 2050. While research on Latinx outdoor recreation in urban areas and city parks has increased over the past twenty years, research on federal and state public lands such as National Forests and Parks has waned. The results from this study show a shift in Latinx use of federal and state public lands. 
A tent at a campsite with a pinata hung under the rainfly
The Latinx population is the largest minority population in the United States and is estimated to comprise 28% of the U.S. population by 2050. While research on Latinx outdoor recreation in urban areas and city parks has increased over the past twenty years, research on federal and state public lands such as National Forests and Parks has waned. The results from this study show a shift in Latinx use of federal and state public lands. 
hunter
Historically, racial and ethnic minorities in the United States are not as likely to recreate or work in the country’s natural lands as are racial whites. Data from the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring program indicate disproportionate utilization of National Forest System recreation opportunities by the nation’s minority racial and ethnic groups. Past individual case studies conducted of regional areas have addressed constraints...
Remote camera captures a wolverine as it approaches a researcher's trap.
Forest Service scientists and their research partners use a novel approach that includes trapping and fitting wolverines with GPS collars that accurately plot their movements in areas of high winter recreation. Thenvolunteer snowmobilers, back-country skiers, and other recreationists carry GPS units in the same areas used by wolverines. Resulting data show how wolverines respond to winter recreation in terms of their movements, behaviors, and...
Westslope cutthroat trout, native to the Columbia River and upper Missouri River hybridize with introduced rainbow trout and have been extirpated from large portions of their historical range.
Hybridization between westslope cutthroat trout and both rainbow trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout is a major conservation concern for the species.  A new broad-scale analysis of hybridization patterns found many pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in headwaters streams.
For nearly 50 years, scientists at the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute (established as the Forest Service Wilderness Management Research Unit in 1967) and their collaborators have compiled important research on natural and social science issues pertaining to wilderness. This archive neatly organizes such research, and makes it available to the public in digital format.
Native trout are culturally and ecologically important, but climate change is likely to shrink the cold-water environments they require. Much can be done to preserve these fish but efficient planning and targeting of conservation resources has been hindered by a lack of broad-scale datasets and precise information about which streams are most likely to support native trout populations later this century. The Climate Shield is a useful took for...
The “Human-Side of Restoration Webinar Series” was launched in 2014 as a collaboration among the Rocky Mountain Research Station, National Forest Foundation and the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute at Colorado State University. The series of seven webinars provided a forum for managers and social scientists to share insights and experiences with the “human side” of restoration, including the interface among ecological restoration, human...
Findings from this project help resource specialists explore the potential impacts of declining hunting participation, identify regions and activities experiencing the greatest decline, anticipate changes to communities dependent on wildlife-associated recreation, and consider new mechanisms to fund wildlife management. 

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