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    Author(s): William J. Otrosina; George T. Ferrell
    Date: 1995
    Source: In: L. G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 87-92
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (434.87 KB)

    Description

    The fact that endemic root disease causing pathogens have evolved with forest ecosystems does not necessarily mean they are inconsequential. A pathogen such as the P group of Heterobasidion annosum has become an intractable problem in many Sierra east side pine stands in California because the fungus is adapted to colonization of freshly cut stump surfaces. The S group of Ha is wide spread among true fir forests in California and may be responsible for maintenance of endemic populations of the fir engraver bark beetles that are attracted to tree roots after site disturbances such as thinning. Fire may also affect various root disease fungi and their pathological behavior in longleaf pine through interactions with various soil factors as a consequence of previous land use.

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    Citation

    Otrosina, William J.; Ferrell, George T. 1995. Root diseases: primary agents and secondary consequences of disturbance. In: L. G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 87-92

    Keywords

    Heterobasidion annosum, forest health, root diseases, plant pathogens, ecological disturbance, forest fires

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