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    Author(s): Michael A. Berry; John D. Bachmann
    Date: 1976
    Source: In: Dochinger, L. S.; Seliga, T. A., eds. Proceedings of the first international symposium on acid precipitation and the forest ecosystem; Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-23. Upper Darby, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 1063-1072
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (392.2 KB)

    Description

    The U.S. Clean Air Act provides mechanisms by which the public welfare may be protected from "any known or anticipated adverse effects associated with the presence of (an) air pollutant in the ambient air." The history of the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to establish and defend a secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides is reviewed. The role of acid rain in producing "welfare effects" is described. Emphasis is given to the fact that a wide range of effects not simply limited to forest vegetation must be considered when designing pollution control programs. The possible effects of ignoring acid rain in developing control strategies to meet health related standards for sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides and particulates are mentioned. Researchers need to be aware of the kinds of information which are needed by regulatory agencies before a regulatory program can be designed for alleviating the threat. Concern and speculation are not adequate. Accurate dose-response information and cumulative damage estimates are needed to quantify the effects of acid rain. Of vital importance are: (1) discovery of pollutant concentrations, mechanisms, and atmospheric conditions which lead to harmful effects: and (2) identification of major sources of the pollutant. The effect such information could have on techniques for meeting ground-level air-quality standards such as tall stacks and Intermittant Control Systems (ICS) is discussed. The desirability of an integrated research effort in this area to answer these needs is stressed. EPA efforts in this regard are mentioned.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Berry, Michael A.; Bachmann, John D. 1976. Developing regulatory programs for the control of acid precipitation. In: Dochinger, L. S.; Seliga, T. A., eds. Proceedings of the first international symposium on acid precipitation and the forest ecosystem; Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-23. Upper Darby, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 1063-1072

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