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Spatial Variation In Growing Season Heat Sums Within Northern Hardwood Forest Canopy Gaps

Author(s):

Paul J. Croft

Year:

2000

Publication type:

Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Primary Station(s):

Northern Research Station

Historical Station(s):

North Central Research Station

Source:

American Meteorological Society. p. 130-134. (2000)

Description

When a gap forms in a forest canopy, the first and most immediate effect on the exposed area is an increase in radiative exchange near the ground. More sunlight reaches the ground during the daytime, and at nighttime the ground is more exposed to longwave radiation influences from the sky. These changes in radiation lead directly to a different near-ground temperature climate than what existed previously. Furthermore, spatial gradients in radiation and temperature now exist within the gap region that did not exist before the gap formed.

Citation

Potter, Brian E. ; Croft, Paul J. 2000. Spatial Variation In Growing Season Heat Sums Within Northern Hardwood Forest Canopy Gaps. American Meteorological Society. p. 130-134. (2000)

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/12117