Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): James M. Vose; Barton D. Clinton; Verl Emrick
    Date: 1995
    Source: In: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Fosbroke, Sandra L. C., ed. Proceedings, 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 1995 March 5-8; Morgantown, WV.: Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-197. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 165-171
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (959.33 KB)

    Description

    We measured forest floor CO2 flux in two contrasting ecosystems (white pine plantation and northern hardwood ecosystems at low and high elevations, respectively) in May and September 1993 to quantify differences and determine factors regulating CO2 fluxes. An automated, IRGA based, flow through system was used with chambers inserted into the soil. This approach allowed quantification of diurnal flux patterns which were subsequently averaged to estimate daily mean flux rates (umol m-2 s-1). Mean flux rates were 60 percent greater in the white pine ecosystem (8.9 umol m-2 s-1) than in the northern hardwood ecosystem (5.6 umol m-2 s-1). Across ecosystems and sample dates, the most important regulating factor was soil temperature (r² = 0.70; p < 0.0001). Mean (24-hr) soil temperature (at 5 cm depth) was 2.5 ºC lower in the northern hardwood stand relative to the white pine stand. All other parameters considered (i.e., soil C:N, root mass, root C:N, litter C:N, litter mass) did not explain the differences in flux rates between sites, but variation in fine root mass and litter C:N did explain spatial and temporal variation within the northern hardwood site. These results indicated that at large spatial scales, variation in soil temperature was more important in regulating forest floor CO2 flux than factors more closely associated with the species composition and productivity of the sites (e.g., litter and root mass and quality).

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Vose, James M.; Clinton, Barton D.; Emrick, Verl 1995. Forest floor CO2 flux from two contrasting ecosystems in the Southern Appalachians. In: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Fosbroke, Sandra L. C., ed. Proceedings, 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 1995 March 5-8; Morgantown, WV.: Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-197. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 165-171

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page