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    Author(s): Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 59-67.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (97.16 KB)

    Description

    Many of Missouri's mature oak-shortleaf pine (Quercus-Pinus echinata) forests are in a mid-transition stage characterized by partial pine overstory, limited pine recruitment, and minimal pine regeneration. Restoration of shortleaf pine communities at a large scale necessitates the understanding and management of natural regeneration. To understand late-successional conditions of shortleaf pine forests, we conducted a complete survey of woody vegetation and canopy openings at six uncut and old second-growth oak-pine stands in southeastern Missouri. A total of 121 canopy gaps were mapped and measured in terms of their size, age, and vegetation structure. Shortleaf pine was a common canopy replacement tree along with black oak (Quercus velutina), white oak (Quercus alba), and hickories (Carya spp.). The abundance of shortleaf pine appears to be diminishing, however, owing to the absence of shortleaf in understory and regeneration layers. The resulting forest probably will consist almost exclusively of hardwoods. Shortleaf pine regeneration in canopy openings was limited by aspect, seed source, and litter depth. In addition to their current conditions, information from these forests provides insight into the future development and management needs of younger oak-pine communities. In forests where regeneration and recruitment of shortleaf pine are lacking, restoration efforts require timely action because the overstory seed source is crucial to preserving the shortleaf pine component. These findings contribute to an understanding of shortleaf pine forests, and can ultimately determine restoration and management guidelines for shortleaf pine forests in the Missouri Ozarks.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Stambaugh, Michael C.; Muzika, Rose-Marie. 2007. Successional trends of six mature shortleaf pine forests in Missouri. In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 59-67.

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