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    Author(s): Kurt W. Gottschalk; Rose-Marie Muzika
    Date: 1995
    Source: In: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Fosbroke, Sandra L. C., ed. Proceedings, 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 1995 March 5-8; Morgantown, WV.: Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-197. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. p.543
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (142.02 KB)

    Description

    Mixed hardwood forests of the Appalachian region support one of the most diverse communities of woody plants in North America, but the composition and relative dominance of the forest changes substantially with slight changes in physiography, soil type, or microclimate. Composition of oak and other species highly preferred by the gypsy moth determines the susceptibility of forests to defoliation. As composition of these species increases, the susceptibility increases. Silvicultural treatments were developed to minimize the effects of gypsy moth defoliation on forests. A research study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of two preoutbreak silvicultural treatments that are applied in different susceptibility stands. Presalvage thinning is designed to reduce the mortality that occurs in stands by taking out the trees with highest estimated probabilities of mortality and increasing the growth and vigor of the residual trees. It is applied in high or very highly susceptible stands (>50 percent oak). Sanitation thinning is designed to reduce the defoliation level (and subsequent mortality) in medium susceptibility stands (20 to 50 percent oak). This reduction is obtained by decreasing oaks and other susceptible species to 20 percent of the stand basal area and increasing vigor of the residual trees. Pour replications of each treatment were established in 1989-90, with a paired untreated control stand for every treated stand.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Muzika, Rose-Marie. 1995. Defoliation and mortality patterns in forests silviculturally managed for gypsy moth. In: Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Fosbroke, Sandra L. C., ed. Proceedings, 10th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 1995 March 5-8; Morgantown, WV.: Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-197. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. p.543

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