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    Author(s): Elizabeth M. Blizzard; Doyle Henken; John M. KabrickDaniel C. Dey; David R. Larsen; David Gwaze
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 138-146.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings
    Station: Northern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (254.23 KB)

    Description

    We conducted an operational study to evaluate effect of site preparation treatments on pine reproduction density and the impact of overstory basal area and understory density on pine reproduction height and basal diameter in pine-oak stands in the Missouri Ozarks. Stands were harvested to or below B-level stocking, but patchiness of the oak decline lead to some plots having no overstory and some having over 200 ft2/ac basal area at the end of the study. In all stands, the midstory and understory were chainsaw felled. If stands were inadequately stocked with pine reproduction, then mechanical scarifying or prescribed burning treatments were applied to increase the density of shortleaf pine reproduction. Pine reproduction basal diameter, height, and crown class within the understory were measured three to eight growing seasons later. We found no long-term difference in pine reproduction density by treatment. Overstory density and reproduction competition both affected the growth of shortleaf pine seedlings. The basal diameter and height of pine reproduction were greatest when overstory basal area was low, reproduction density was low, and pine seedlings were dominant or codominant to competitors within the understory. Pines had an 80 percent chance of being dominant/codominant with 2,000 TPA of mixed-species reproduction with no overstory, but only a 50 percent probability with 6,000 TPA of reproduction and 70 ft2/ac of overstory basal area.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Blizzard, Elizabeth M.; Henken, Doyle; Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Larsen, David R.; Gwaze, David. 2007. Shortleaf pine reproduction abundance and growth in pine-oak stands in the Missouri Ozarks. In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 138-146.

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