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    Author(s): Lisa J. Petit; Daniel R. Petit; Thomas E. Martin
    Date: 1993
    Source: In: Baker, James B., camp. Proceedings of the symposium on ecosystem management research in the Ouachita Mountains: pretreatment conditions and preliminary findings; 1993 October 26-27; Hot Springs, AR. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-l 12. New Orleans, IA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station: 117-l 25.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (427 KB)

    Description

    Habitat relationships of birds are well known compared to those of other taxa. However, a major obstacle to developing rigorous management plans for birds is the collation and transfer of information from widely scattered technical and academic publications to a form that can be applied directly to the management of species. Recognizing this dilemma, Hamel (1992) produced a comprehensive summary of bird-habitat relationships for 23 forest types in the Southeastern United States. The explicit purpose of Hamel's sumamry was to aid land managers in projecting the impacts of silvicultural practices and mauagement activities on bird populations. Ecosystem Management Research offered a unique opportunity to develop and test predictions derived from Hamel's bird-habitat matrices. Given its probable widespread use by wildlife biologists and land managers, Hamel's compilation needs its strengths and weeknesses identified for the future development of accurate predictive models of wildlife habitat in the Southeastern United States. Predictions of immediate changes in abundances of species and guilds occupying MO-rotation Pine-hardwood stands were developed in this paper for four harvesting treatments. Clearcutting and shelterwood beating were predicted to be more detrimental to the overall breeding bird community in late-rotation stands than were group or single-tree selection, although at least several species were predicted to increase in each silvicultural treatment. Bark, aerial, and canopy insectivores were predicted to exhibit more substautial declines in populations than carnivores, shrub insectivores, and ground foragers. In addition, species that place their nests in shrubs were predicted to undergo fewer declines than species that place nests in the canopy, tree cavities, and on the ground.

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    Citation

    Petit, Lisa J.; Petit, Daniel R.; Martin, Thomas E. 1993. Predicting the Effects of Ecosystem Management Harvesting Treatments on Breeding Birds in Pine-Hardwood Forests. In: Baker, James B., camp. Proceedings of the symposium on ecosystem management research in the Ouachita Mountains: pretreatment conditions and preliminary findings; 1993 October 26-27; Hot Springs, AR. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-l 12. New Orleans, IA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station: 117-l 25.

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