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    Author(s): W. Keith MoserEarl C. LeatherberryMark H. HansenBrett Butler
    Date: 2005
    Source: Moser W.K., Leatherberry E.C., Hansen M.H. and Butler B. 2005. Farmers and woods: a look at woodlands and woodland owner intentions in the heartland. In: Brooks K.N. and Ffolliott P.F. (eds) Moving Agroforestry into the Mainstream. Proc. 9th N. Am. Agroforest. Conf., Rochester, MN. 12-15 June 2005 [CD-ROM]. Dept. Forest Resources, Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 14 p.
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (302.43 KB)

    Description

    This paper reports the results of a pilot study that explores the relationship between farm woodland owners` stated intentions for owning woodland, and their use of the land, with the structure and composition of the woodland. Two databases maintained by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program were used in the analysis-- the FIA forest resources inventory and National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS). From the forest resources inventory database we were able to estimate measures of volume and diversity of the forest resources. We matched the resource data to the owner`s stated intentions, actions and goals as expressed in the NWOS mail-back questionnaire. The analysis revealed a number of relationships among woodland owners. For instance, owners interested in income potential generally had higher volumes on their woodlands. Those who valued aesthetics or enjoyment of their wooded land had fairly well-stocked stands and larger volumes per tree. Farmers who harvested sawtimber and veneer from their woodlands had higher volumes per hectare, whereas those who harvested firewood had a lower volume per hectare. We found the highest number of species on land owned for timber production and wildlife purposes. The Shannon index for species was highest on biodiversity, investment, legacy, timber and wildlife properties, whereas the index for diameter and height was highest on aesthetics, timber, wildlife, and biodiversity farms. As changes in the agriculture sector and population shifts alter the rural landscape, FIA data can provide insight into emerging resource trends in the Midwest and can be used to identify opportunities for expanding management of farm forest resources.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Moser, W. Keith; Leatherberry, Earl C.; Hansen, Mark H.; Butler, Brett. 2005. Farmers and woods: a look at woodlands and woodland-owner intentions in the heartland. Moser W.K., Leatherberry E.C., Hansen M.H. and Butler B. 2005. Farmers and woods: a look at woodlands and woodland owner intentions in the heartland. In: Brooks K.N. and Ffolliott P.F. (eds) Moving Agroforestry into the Mainstream. Proc. 9th N. Am. Agroforest. Conf., Rochester, MN. 12-15 June 2005 [CD-ROM]. Dept. Forest Resources, Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 14 p.

    Keywords

    Farm, forest inventory, landowner survey, United States, woodlands

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