Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Andrew J. Friedland; Eric K. Miller
    Date: 1996
    Source: In: Hom, John; Birdsey, Richard; O'Brian, Kelly, eds. Proceedings 1995 meeting of the northern global change program; Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-214. Radnor, PA: U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 77-81.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (316.69 KB)

    Description

    Patterns and trends in forest elemental cycling can become more apparent in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. High-elevation forests of the northeastern United States have received large amounts of atmospheric deposition of pollutants, which have altered natural elemental cycling and retention rates in a variety of ways. This study examined atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, sulfur and base cations, and their interactions in a high-elevation forest on Whiteface Mountain, New York. Eight years of elemental cycling data (1 986- 1993) have shown that at our main study site (1050-m elevation), atmospheric deposition of N was approximately 16.7 kg N ha-1 yr-1, with 32 percent contributed by cloud water. Atmospheric deposition of S was 16.3 kg S ha-1 yr-1, with 37 percent contributed by cloud water. Total atmospheric inputs of nitrogen and sulfur to the forest canopy increased by a factor of four and five, respectively, over the elevational range of 600 to 1275 m, largely due to the increased importance of cloud water deposition at high elevations. At 1050-m elevation, analyses of total ecosystem inventories and cycling revealed that nitrogen and potassium are conserved or retained in the ecosystem while sulfur, calcium and magnesium show losses in a relatively undisturbed spruce-fir-birch ecosystem.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Friedland, Andrew J.; Miller, Eric K. 1996. Elemental cycling response of an Adirondack subalpine spruce-fir forest to atmospheric and environmental change. In: Hom, John; Birdsey, Richard; O''Brian, Kelly, eds. Proceedings 1995 meeting of the northern global change program; Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-214. Radnor, PA: U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 77-81.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/13389