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    Author(s): Paul A. Murphy; David L. Graney
    Date: 1988
    Source: Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 22(3):184-192.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (127 KB)

    Description

    Models were developed for individual-tree basal area growth, survival, and total heights for different species of upland hardwoods in the Boston Mountains of north Arkansas. Data used were from 87 permanent plots located in an array of different sites and stand ages; the plots were thinned to different stocking levels and included unthinned controls. To test these three tree models, stand development for 5 and 10 years were simulated in terms of stand basal area/ac, numbers of trees/ac, and quadratic mean diameter. Percent mean differences for the three variables indicated no serious biases. A long-term projection of 100 years to test model reasonableness showed development that would be consistent with these stands. These equations provide forest managers the first upland hardwood individual-tree growth models specifically for this region.

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    Citation

    Murphy, Paul A.; Graney, David L. 1988. Individual-tree basal area growth, survival, and total height models for upland hardwoods in the Boston Mountains of Arkansa. Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 22(3):184-192.

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