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    Author(s): Monica G. Turner; Thomas R. Crow; Jianguo Liu; Dale Rabe; Charles F. Rabeni; Patricia A. Soranno; William W. Taylor; Kristiina A. Vogt; John A. Wiens
    Date: 2002
    Source: In: Liu, Jianguo; Taylor, William W., eds.Integrating Landscape Ecology into Natural Resource Management. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press: 433-460
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.51 MB)

    Description

    The challenges facing natural resource managers occur over entire landscapes and involve landscape components at many scales. Many resource managers are shifting their approach from managing resources such as fish, wildlife, and water separately to managing for the integrity of entire ecosystems (Christensen et al., 1996). Indeed, nearly all resource management agencies in the USA have recognized that informed management decisions cannot be made exclusively at the level of habitat units or local sites. It is generally accepted that ecological patterns and processes must be considered over large areas when biodiversity and ecological function must be maintained while the goods and services desired by the public are provided. For example, forest managers must determine the patterns and timing of tree harvesting while maintaining an amount and arrangement of habitats that will sustain many species. Managers of parks and nature reserves must be attentive to actions occurring on surrounding lands outside their jurisdiction. Aquatic resource managers must broaden their perspective to encompass the terrestrial and human landscape to manage stream and lake resources effectively (Hynes, 1975, widely regarded as the father of modern stream ecology and quoted above; Naiman et al., 1995). Landscape ecology also is implicit in the paradigm of ecosystem management (Grumbine, 1994; christensen et al., 1996).

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    Citation

    Turner, Monica G.; Crow, Thomas R.; Liu, Jianguo; Rabe, Dale; Rabeni, Charles F.; Soranno, Patricia A.; Taylor, William W.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Wiens, John A. 2002. Bridging the gap between landscape ecologyand natural resource management. In: Liu, Jianguo; Taylor, William W., eds.Integrating Landscape Ecology into Natural Resource Management. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press: 433-460

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