Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): E. S. VerryR. K. Kolka
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: Renard, Kenneth G.;et al., eds. 1st Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds; 2003 October 27-30; Benson, AZ. [City, State]: US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: 126-132
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.06 MB)

    Description

    Hewlett (1961) proposed the variable-source-area concept of streamflow origin in the mountains of North Carolina suggesting streamflow was produced from water leaving saturated areas near the channel. Dunne and Black confirmed this concept on the Sleepers River watershed in Vermont (1970). Areas near the river were saturated by subsurface or interflow from adjacent upland slopes. In turn, these saturated areas fed water directly to the channel. In the northern Lake States, wetlands and lakes make up 10 to 35% of the basin. These flat landscape components are surrounded by relatively steep (10-15% slope) glacial moraine uplands. We investigated the importance of wetlands to streamflow production on watershed two at the Marcell Experimental Forest in north central Minnesota. A hydrograph seperation technique for the entire watershed yielded hydrographs for water both from the upland alone and from the wetland alone. Additionally, selected direct measurements of upland runoff and watershed streamflow confirmed the timing of hydrograph peaks for the separated watershed components. The wetland produced 50 to 70% of the annual streamflow even though the wetland comprised only l/3" of the basin. Storm peaks from the wetland were 5 to 10 times higher than storm peaks from the upland and occurred about 1 hour before upland runoff peaked. Saturated wetlands (and lake surfaces) are the primary source of streamflow in these glacial landscapes.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Verry, E. S.; Kolka, R. K. 2003. Importance of Wetlands to Streamflow Generation. In: Renard, Kenneth G.;et al., eds. 1st Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds; 2003 October 27-30; Benson, AZ. [City, State]: US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: 126-132

    Keywords

    source of streamflow, peatlands, uplands, subsurface flow, interflow, hydrograph separation

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page