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    Author(s): Matthew J. Kelty
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 11-13
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (298.65 KB)

    Description

    In the early part of this century, considerable interest existed in the silviculture of hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) in the southern New England region, where it occurs in mixture with oak (Quercus spp.), white pine (Pinus strobus L.), birches (Betula spp.), and maples (Acer spp.). Difficulties encountered with the regeneration of white pine led to the idea that hemlock should be promoted through management as an alternative conifer sawtimber species. Research at forestry institutions in Connecticut and Massachusetts beginning in the 1920's demonstrated the ease with which hemlock-hardwood stands could be converted to pure hemlock by removing the hardwood overstories. However, early attempts to regenerate hemlock in mature hemlock-dominated stands met with difficulties. Shelterwood and group selection methods failed to establish hemlock dependably; problems were ascribed to the deep litter layer, which inhibited establishment of hemlock more than that of some hardwood species, especially black birch (Betula lenta L.). Scarification promoted hemlock regeneration, but also promoted the much faster growing black birch. These case studies provide the basis for predicting stand dynamics pathways for hemlock-hardwood stands under different disturbance regimes, both natural and silvicultural.

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    Citation

    Kelty, Matthew J. 2000. Silviculture and stand dynamics of hemlock-dominated stands in southern New England: some lessons from early research. In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station: 11-13

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