Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Jennifer C. Jenkins; Charles D. Canham; Paul K. Barten
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 62-75.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (940.96 KB)

    Description

    The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand.), an introduced pest specializing on eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.), threatens to cause widespread hemlock mortality in New England forests. In this study, we used a stem-based model of forest dynamics (SORTIE) to predict forest development in a northeastern forest both with and without eastern hemlock. In all simulations, forest development was explained by species-specific life-history characteristics such as growth, mortality, and recruitment as they relate to light availability. Forest composition after 500 years depended on the relative abundances of late-successional species: eastern hemlock was long-lived but did not easily gain or yield space; American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) gained dominance quickly and soon comprised nearly all basal area in a stand unless hemlock was present; and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton) persisted if beech and hemlock were absent. Early-successional species thrived in the forest if late-successional species were not present. We conclude that the long-term impact of the hemlock woolly adelgid on forest composition in northeastern forests will depend both on initial species composition and on the extent of hemlock death. If 50% of the overstory basal area in hemlock is removed by the adelgid, and if the adelgid does not persist at densities high enough to cause extended damage, hemlock stands will continue to be dominated by hemlock. Mixed hemlock-hardwood stands will be dominated by the late-successional species remaining. If hemlock death is near 90% of overstory basal area, hemlock is likely to continue to persist in low densities while the other late-successional species gain dominance. If hemlock death is complete, all stands will be dominated by beech and yellow birch where they are present, no matter what their initial abundances. Hardwood stands will not be affected by the adelgid.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Jenkins, Jennifer C.; Canham, Charles D.; Barten, Paul K. 2000. Predicting long-term forest development following hemlock mortality. In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 62-75.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/14644