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    Author(s): Richard L. Boyce
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 113-121.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (628.56 KB)

    Description

    In order to quantify relationships between environmental factors and the distribution of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) and other tree species, sites were established every 100 m along four contour lines, lying at 455 m (1500'), 610 m (2000'), 760 m (2500') and 915 m (3000') on Mt. Ascutney, a monadnock in the Connecticut River valley of eastern Vermont that rises to 960 m (3150'). At each site, basal areas of all trees were determined with a 2.5 BAF metric prism. Dominance, or relative basal area per hectare, of each species was then calculated. At each site, slope, aspect and topographic position were recorded. Fuzzy set ordination was then used to find relationships between these environmental factors and hemlock distribution. Overall, hemlock was the most dominant species at 455 m, the lowest elevation (it was not found at the two higher ones). Hemlock was an important codominant at 610 m. At 455 m, hemlock was a significant component at all aspects, but was most dominant on northwest aspects. At 610 m, it was most important on west aspects. It was also most dominant at intermediate topographic positions (e.g. slopes), with little difference between elevations. Although hemlock is ofte n considered to be important in cool, dark, wet stream bottoms, the results of this study indicate that hemlock is also important at more well-drained upland sites.

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    Citation

    Boyce, Richard L. 2000. Relationships between environmental factors and hemlock distribution at Mt. Ascutney, Vermont. In: McManus, Katherine A.; Shields, Kathleen S.; Souto, Dennis R., eds. Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in eastern North America. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-267. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 113-121.

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/14686