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    Author(s): Douglass F. Jacobs; John R. Seifert
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Michler, C.H.; Pijut, P.M.; Van Sambeek, J.W.; Coggeshall, M.V.; Seifert, J.; Woeste, K.; Overton, R.; Ponder, F., Jr., eds. Proceedings of the 6th Walnut Council Research Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-243. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 66-70
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (361.7 KB)

    Description

    Bareroot hardwood seedlings typically undergo transplant shock immediately following planting before root systems are established. Fertilization at planting may act to minimize transplant shock by reducing nutrient stresses. However, previous work with fertilization of hardwoods at planting has generally relied on fertilizers with nutrient forms immediately available. These fertilizers have relatively low rates of fertilizer use efficiency, as the vast majority of applied nutrients are not available for plant uptake. Thus, response of hardwood seedlings to fertilization at planting has traditionally been minimal and is rarely recommended operationally. Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) is a relatively new technology available for reforestation in which nutrients are slowly released over the course of one to two growing seasons. We tested the use of Osmocote® Exact 15N-9P-10K plus minors (16 to 18 month release) polymer-coated CRF applied to the root zone at planting with three hardwood species: black walnut, white ash, and yellow-poplar in southern Indiana. Application of 60 g per seedling accelerated first-year height growth by 52% and diameter growth by 37% compared to controls (averaged over species). These preliminary results indicate that CRF may provide a previously untested means to improve hardwood afforestation planting success.

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    Citation

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Seifert, John R. 2004. Facilitating nutrient aquisition of black walnut and other hardwoods at plantation establishment. In: Michler, C.H.; Pijut, P.M.; Van Sambeek, J.W.; Coggeshall, M.V.; Seifert, J.; Woeste, K.; Overton, R.; Ponder, F., Jr., eds. Proceedings of the 6th Walnut Council Research Symposium; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-243. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station. 66-70

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