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    Author(s): Gretel E. Hengst; Jeffery O. Dawson
    Date: 1993
    Source: In: Gillespie, Andrew R.; Parker, George R.; Pope, Phillip E.; Rink, George: eds. Proceedings of the 9th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-161. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 55-75
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2.64 MB)

    Description

    Some physical, thermal, and chemical properties of bark of eleven tree species native to the central hardwood region were measured to determine their potential to protect the vascular cambium from damage by fire. The relationship between dbh and bark thickness for each of sixteen species was determined. For purposes of monitoring seasonal trends, two species (Quercus macrocarpa Michx. and Acer saccharinum L.) were sampled periodically during one growing season. Heat transfer through bark tissue of eleven species was monitored during simulated fires conducted in the field. Bark samples were analyzed for moisture content, specific gravity, dry weight, and time until ignition, and subjected to standard test methods for determination of volatile matter content. Overall, heat flux and maximal cambial temperatures during simulated fires were reduced as bark thickness increased. Thick-barked species had lower maximal temperatures, longer times to reach peak temperatures, slower rates of heat loss, and shorter time until surface ignition. Populus deltoides Marsh. was the most fire resistant among species tested, while Acer saccharinum was the least. Specific gravity was positively correlated with thermal conductivity and likely influenced the rate at which cambial temperatures rose as well as the time required for surface ignition. Moisture content was lower in thin-barked species with higher specific gravities.

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    Citation

    Hengst, Gretel E.; Dawson, Jeffery O. 1993. Bark thermal properties of selected central hardwood species. In: Gillespie, Andrew R.; Parker, George R.; Pope, Phillip E.; Rink, George: eds. Proceedings of the 9th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-161. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 55-75

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