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    Author(s): Michelle Henderson; Jeffery O. Dawson; Evan H. DeLucia
    Date: 1993
    Source: In: Gillespie, Andrew R.; Parker, George R.; Pope, Phillip E.; Rink, George: eds. Proceedings of the 9th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-161. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 107-118
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (2 MB)

    Description

    Phenological patterns, light conditions, and photosynthetic activity of Ohio buckeye and sugar maple foliage on trees in the forest understory were monitored and compared over two growing seasons in two mesophytic upland woodlands in central Illinois. Ohio buckeye began leaf expansion three to four weeks earlier than sugar maple, started leaf senescence and shedding in July, and had lost all leaves by September 1. Sugar maple began senescence in September and lost its leaves by the end of October. Thirty percent area inventories of both Ohio buckeye and sugar maple vegetation on both 24-hectare forests were performed to determine recruitment from small size classes to larger size classes. Ohio buckeye had large numbers of seedlings in the 0-2 cm stem diameter class (990 and 1,032 stems/ha), but far fewer saplings and trees. Buckeye distribution was patchy and concentrated in gaps and along the edges of the forest. Sugar maple had more small seedlings than Ohio buckeye (2,767 and 1,311 stems per ha <2 cm stem diameter) and more saplings and trees than buckeye. Maples were more evenly distributed throughout the forest. During July with understory light intensities less than 50 umol/m²/sec PAR, understory sugar maple net photosynthesis averaged 4-5 umol/m²/sec CO2 while Ohio buckeye rates were always less than 1. This study suggests that Ohio buckeye takes advantage of high light levels in the spring to acquire much of its carbon, as is the case with spring ephemerals, and differs from sugar maple in its adaptation to limited light.

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    Citation

    Henderson, Michelle; Dawson, Jeffery O.; DeLucia, Evan H. 1993. Phenology and recruitment of Ohio buckeye and sugar maple in Illinois forest stands. In: Gillespie, Andrew R.; Parker, George R.; Pope, Phillip E.; Rink, George: eds. Proceedings of the 9th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-161. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station: 107-118

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