Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Stephen R. ShifleyZhaofei FanJohn M. Kabrick; Randy G. Jensen
    Date: 2006
    Source: Forest Ecology and Management 229:16-26
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (337.46 KB)

    Description

    Managers are often concerned about oak mortality in maturing mixed-oak forests, but they often lack explicit information about mortality risk for oaks that differ in species, size, crown class, competitive status, and growth rate. In eastern North America, tree species in the red oak group (Quercus Section Lobatae) are typically shorter lived than those in the white oak group (Section Quercus), and red oak group mortality can be greatly exacerbated during episodes of oak decline. We analyzed factors associated with red oak group mortality for two large data sets from the Ozark Highlands and identified groups of trees that differed significantly in mortality risk. One data set was from a large, upland Ozark forest with more than four decades of uneven-aged management, and the other was representative of relatively undisturbed upland oak forests in the same ecoregion. Neither location experienced significant episodes of oak decline during the period of observation, and our results represent endemic mortality for mature (sawtimber size) forests in the region. We found that mortality rates for trees in the red oak group were four to six times greater than mortality rates for associated trees in the white oak group. We also found that red oak group mortality was significantly related to tree crown class, tree diameter, and basal area of larger competitors. When recent tree dbh growth was known, it significantly increased the ability to predict future mortality for some classes of trees. Annual mortality rates for different classes of trees in the red oak group ranged from 0.4 to 10.7%. Classes of trees in the red oak group that were most likely to die (in rank) were as follows: trees with dbh growth <0.2 cm per year; suppressed trees; trees with intermediate crown class and basal area of larger competitors >14 m²/ha; dominant and codominant trees >25 cm dbh with basal area of larger competitors <14 m²/ha; trees with intermediate crown class and basal area of larger competitors <14 m²/ha; dominant and codominant trees >25 cm dbh with basal area of larger competitors <15 m²/ha; dominant and codominant trees <25 cm dbh with basal area of larger competitors >15 m²/ha; dominant and codominant trees <25 cm dbh with basal area of larger competitors <15 m²/ha; and trees with annual dbh growth greater than 0.6 cm (assuming recent dbh growth is known). This information can be used when preparing silvicultural prescriptions and/or forest management plans to identify and treat classes of trees that are at high risk of mortality.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Shifley, Stephen R.; Fan, Zhaofei; Kabrick, John M.; Jensen, Randy G. 2006. Oak mortality risk factors and mortality estimation. Forest Ecology and Management 229:16-26

    Keywords

    Mortality model, CART, Oak decline, Ozark

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page