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    Author(s): John M. Lhotka; James J. Zaczek
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 199-202
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (42.38 KB)

    Description

    With the current emphasis and interest in riparian forest management, it is necessary to develop management strategies that enhance and regenerate bottomland hardwoods in these biologically important areas. However, the regeneration of bottomland oaks has been problematic across much of the eastern United States. Two ongoing studies presented in this paper suggest that soil scarification, in the presence of abundant acorns, can increase the initial establishment of oak. One study assesses the effects of disk scarification on first year seedling establishment in a mixed-oak bottomland forest. The second study was conducted on an upland site within a fenced shelterwood and assesses the effects of bulldozer scarification on the development of seedlings 5 years after treatment. In both studies, the initial density of oak seedlings was greater and density and height of competitive tree species was reduced in the scarified areas than in the controls. Furthermore, the upland study showed that the benefits of scarification could be carried through year 5. From these studies, management recommendations have been developed and the implications of these recommendations for riparian management are presented. Finally, these studies suggest that soil scarification may be a useful tool for augmenting oak seedling reproduction in poorly regenerating riparian forests.

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    Citation

    Lhotka, John M.; Zaczek, James J. 2003. The development of oak reproduction following soil scarification - implications for riparian forest management. In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 199-202

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