Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): James S. Rentch; Ray R., Jr. Hicks
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 323-332
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (251.6 KB)

    Description

    Using a radial growth averaging technique, changes in growth rates of overstory oaks were used to quantify canopy disturbance events at five old-growth sites. On average, at least one canopy disturbance occurred on these sites every 3 years; larger multiple-tree disturbances occurred every 17 years. Although there was some variation by site and by historical period, there has been little significant change in canopy disturbance rates for the 300-year period examined. A review of tree-ring chronologies yielded three growth strategies. For these oaks, a) the likelihood of originating in a large opening and achieving overstory status before canopy closure is about the same as the probability of requiring a major release, either from b) a smaller gap that closed, or c) from the understory. Half of the cored trees established individually, and 30 percent attained overstory status individually, members of no identifiable larger cohort. For trees that required a major canopy release, residence time in the understory averaged 89, 54, and 50 years for white oak, red oak, and black oak, respectively. These long-term understory residences averages suggest that the abundance of shade tolerant understory species was considerably less before 1900. These results are consistent with presettlement survey tree-tallies, the absence of shade tolerant species in the oldest cohorts, and fact that virtually no oak canopy recruitment after 1900 occurred after an extended period of below-average growth in the understory.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Rentch, James S.; Hicks, Ray R., Jr. 2003. Canopy disturbance intervals, early growth rates, and canopy accession trends of oak-dominated old-growth forests. In: Van Sambeek, J. W.; Dawson, Jeffery O.; Ponder Jr., Felix; Loewenstein, Edward F.; Fralish, James S., eds. Proceedings of the 13th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-234. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 323-332

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page