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    Author(s): Charles M. Stangle; Lytton J. Musselman
    Date: 1981
    Source: Res. Note SO-276. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 3 p.
    Publication Series: Research Note (RN)
    Station: Southern Forest Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (294 KB)

    Description

    The root parasite, Seymeria cassioides, will not initiate height growth without attachment to a host root when grown under normal fertility conditions, although the seedling may remain alive for 40 days or more without a host. During this time the roots elongate markedly. Fresh pine root segments do not influence the direction of root growth. Although S. cassioides is always root parasitic in nature, it apparently produces most of its own food, as plants that are vigorously parasitizing pines die when placed in the dark even though the host plant is exposed to light.

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    Citation

    Stangle, Charles M.; Musselman, Lytton J. 1981. Some Growth Aspects of Seymeria cassioicies. Res. Note SO-276. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 3 p.

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    Keywords

    root parasite, hemiparasite, Scrophulariaceae

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