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    Author(s): F. I. McCracken
    Date: 1989
    Source: In: Hutchinson, Jay G., ed. Central hardwood notes. St. Paul, MN.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 8.06
    Publication Series: Other
    Station: North Central Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (693.07 KB)

    Description

    The canker stain disease, one of several fungi that cause cankers of sycamore, can cause serious loss of sycamores in natural stands, plantations, and urban areas. As many as 35 percent of the trees in some stands may be diseased. Affected trees develop thin crowns, twig dieback, small leaves and epicormic branches. The narrow, elongate, bark covered, flat, spiraling stem cankers may be obscure (fig 1A). Probing the edge of a suspected canker with a knife will expose both bright-colored healthy and darkened diseased tissues. The "wedge" of wood beneath cankers will be dark stained.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    McCracken, F. I. 1989. Sycamore diseases. In: Hutchinson, Jay G., ed. Central hardwood notes. St. Paul, MN.: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 8.06

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