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    Author(s): Julius Novotny; Milan Zubrik
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: McManus, Michael L.; Liebhold, Andrew M., eds. Proceedings: Ecology, Survey and Management of Forest Insects; 2002 September 1-5; Krakow, Poland. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-311. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 80-86.
    Publication Series: Other
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (120.37 KB)

    Description

    Characteristics such as the duration of the larval stage and attraction of larvae to oviposition by an endoparasitic wasp were evaluated between groups of irradiated and non irradiated gypsy moth larvae. Untreated larvae required a shorter time to reach the adult stage (both male and female). The mortality of larvae was highest at the highest irradiation dose. Pupae that developed from larvae or eggs irradiated at 110 Gy possessed a high degree of morphological abnormalities (93.18%) whereas in the control group, only 3% were affected. Larval mortality caused by G. liparidis reached 17% in the control group and 6% in the irradiated treatment. The natural population density of gypsy moth at the study plot was low during the experiment and corresponded to a period of latency. Of 750 larvae collected at all sites in 2001, 21.3% were killed by parasitoids and 54.4% by pathogens and unknown causes. There was a significant difference in the mortality of gypsy moth larvae between selected treatments under field conditions. The parasitic fly Compsilura concinnata was the most important parasitoid species present in the sites.

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    Citation

    Novotny, Julius; Zubrik, Milan. 2003. Sterile insect technique as a tool for increasing the efficacy of gypsy moth biocontrol. In: McManus, Michael L.; Liebhold, Andrew M., eds. Proceedings: Ecology, Survey and Management of Forest Insects; 2002 September 1-5; Krakow, Poland. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-311. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 80-86.

    Keywords

    gypsy moth, Glyptapanteles liparidis, gamma radiation, larvae developmental time, SIT, parasitoids

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