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    Author(s): Lidia Sukovata; Andrzej Kolk; Jadwiga Jaroszynska; Urszula Krajewska; Agnieszka Purzynska; Valerii Isidorov
    Date: 2003
    Source: In: McManus, Michael L.; Liebhold, Andrew M., eds. Proceedings: Ecology, Survey and Management of Forest Insects; 2002 September 1-5; Krakow, Poland. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-311. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 98-106.
    Publication Series: Other
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (141.06 KB)

    Description

    The larvae of Dendrolimus pini L. and Panolis flammea (Den. et Schiff.) usually occur in high numbers on different trees within a stand. Studies that focused on the host tree-preference of these two species were conducted in the Wymiarki Forest District (Poland) in 2001. Sixteen Scots pine trees were selected to estimate the larval abundance of both species using 1x1 m collectors. In June the trees were cut down, the larvae in crown were counted and the samples of needles for chemical analysis were taken from the lower, middle and upper parts of the crowns. Natural radiation was measured under each tree using the methods developed by dowsers (radiesthets). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of any terpene or phenolic acid in different parts of crowns. The abundance of pine moth larvae was related significantly with 7 monoterpenes, 6 sesquiterpenes and 5 phenolic acids, while the abundance of the pine beauty moth was related with 5 monoterpenes, 6 sesquiterpenes and 1 phenolic acid. There were 6 compounds which had significant impact on the abundance of both species: a-pinene was in positive relationship with D. pini and inverse with P. flammea, while the compound with a retention index of 1430, ã-muurolene, â-vetivenene, á-cadinene and protocatechuic acid were in inverse relationships with D. pini and positive with P. flammea. These differences may explain why these insect species are rarely observed in high numbers on the same trees. Natural radiation is possibly one of the causes of variation of secondary metabolites in Scots pine needles. It was in significant relationships with 9 monoterpenes, 3 sesquiterpenes and 1 phenolic acid. The results of studies suggest that â-pinene and sesquiterpene with a retention index of 1430 are the only links between natural radiation and abundance of both D. pini and P. flammea.

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    Citation

    Sukovata, Lidia; Kolk, Andrzej; Jaroszynska, Jadwiga; Krajewska, Urszula; Purzynska, Agnieszka; Isidorov, Valerii. 2003. Host-tree preferences of the pine moth (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) and pine beauty moth (Lepidopera: Noctuidae) larvae in relation to needle quality. In: McManus, Michael L.; Liebhold, Andrew M., eds. Proceedings: Ecology, Survey and Management of Forest Insects; 2002 September 1-5; Krakow, Poland. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-311. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 98-106.

    Keywords

    Dendrolimus pini, Panolis flammea, host preference, secondary metabolites, terpenes, phenolics, natural radiation

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