Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): John M. Halstead; Wendy Harper; L. Bruce Hill
    Date: 2001
    Source: In: Kyle, Gerard, comp., ed. 2001. Proceedings of the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-276. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 58-63
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Northeastern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (281.3 KB)

    Description

    The issue of visibility degradation and its impact on visitors to national parks and wilderness areas helped prompt passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977. This act required the U.S. EPA, the states, and federal land managers of national parks and wilderness areas to protect and restore visibility in these areas. Yet, as Hill et al. state (1995, p.2) AVisibility throughout the United States--especially in the Northeast-has declined substantially as human-induced regional smog conditions have become progressively worse. While degraded visibility may adversely impact visitors experiences and pose questions of health effects, it is also possible that gradually declining visibility may reduce the number of visits to a site, which could lead to negative multiplier effects on the regions economy. Using data collected from a survey conducted in 1997 - 1998, this paper examines how (if at all) declining visibility in the White Mountain National Forest of New Hampshire has affected visitors experiences and affected the probability of return visits. Photographs provided by the U.S. Forest Service of Mt. Jefferson, a 1,743 m peak in the Great Gulf Wilderness, were used to illustrate changes in visual range. Combining this information with data on travel costs and other trip expenditures, estimates are generated of the local economic impact of visibility degradation.

    Publication Notes

    • Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
    • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat.
    • During the capture process some typographical errors may occur.
    • Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Halstead, John M.; Harper, Wendy; Hill, L. Bruce. 2001. Degraded visibility and visitor behavior: the case of New Hampshire''s White Mountain National Forest. In: Kyle, Gerard, comp., ed. 2001. Proceedings of the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-276. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 58-63

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/19667