Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Christopher D. Barton; John I. Blake; Donald W. Imm
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Kilgo, J.C.; Blake, J.I. eds. Ecology and management of a forested landscape. Washington, DC: Island Press. 84-102. Chapter 3.
    Publication Series: Book Chapter
    Station: Southern Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (3.0 MB)

    Description

    The long history of human settlement, agriculture, and industry at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has created extensive opportunities for ecological restoration. Two hundred years of farming, drainage, dam construction, stream channeling, fire protection, subsistence hunting and fishing, exotic animal and plant introduction, and selective timber harvesting have caused major changes in the SRS landscape (table 3.4). These activities degraded the native plant and animal communities by removing species for commercial use (e.g., longleaf pine, white oaks; see appendix for scientific names of plants) or subsistence needs (e.g., white-tailed deer, wild turkey [Meleagris gallopavo]; see table 4.24 for scientific names of mammals). Tillage eliminated native vegetation locally, and exotics (e.g., kudzu, hogs, and cattle) competed with or damaged native species. Activities also altered natural hydrologic and wildfire regimes essential to the maintenance of native communities. Baseline surveys of the flora and fauna at SRS in the 1950s provide a measure of the degree of human impact (e.g., Batson and Kelley 1953; Freeman 1954; Freeman 1955).

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Barton, Christopher D.; Blake, John I.; Imm, Donald W. 2005. Ecological restoration. In: Kilgo, J.C.; Blake, J.I. eds. Ecology and management of a forested landscape. Washington, DC: Island Press. 84-102. Chapter 3.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page