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    Author(s): Paul E. Johns; John C. Kilgo
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Kilgo, J.C.; Blake, J.I. eds. Ecology and management of a forested landscape. Washington, DC: Island Press. 380-389. Chapter 6.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (0.97 MB)

    Description

    from a public relations standpoint, the white-tailed deer (Odocileus virginiamus) is probably the most important wildlife species occurring on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS deer herd has been the subject of more scientific investigations than any comparable deer population in the world, resulting in more than 125 published papers. Each year more than 5,500 people apply to be drawn for one of the public hunts, and with articles in hunting magazines such as Buckmasters (Handley 2000), hunters ahve applied from as far away as Alaska and Italy. In thirty-six years on the SRs, over 150,000 hunters ahve harvested over 40,000 deer. Each deer harvested in South Carolina brings an estimated $1,500 into state and local economies (U.S. Department of Interior et al. 1997).

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    Citation

    Johns, Paul E.; Kilgo, John C. 2005. White-tailed deer. In: Kilgo, J.C.; Blake, J.I. eds. Ecology and management of a forested landscape. Washington, DC: Island Press. 380-389. Chapter 6.

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