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Sagebrush identification, ecology, and palatability relative to sage-grouse

Author(s):

Roger Rosentreter

Year:

2005

Publication type:

Proceedings (P)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 3-16

Description

Basic identification keys and comparison tables for 23 low and big sagebrush (Artemisia) taxa are presented. Differences in sagebrush ecology, soil temperature regimes, geographic range, palatability, mineralogy, and chemistry are discussed. Coumarin, a chemical produced in the glands of some Artemisia species, causes UV-light fluorescence of the leaves. Coumarin-containing taxa, such as mountain, xeric, subalpine big, subalpine early, black, and low sagebrush, each fluoresce a bright bluish-white color. These taxa are also the most palatable. A table of UV-light fluorescence of 20 sagebrush taxa in water solution is provided. How plant chemicals, such as coumarin and methacrolein and their seasonal variation, relate to palatability and animal preference is discussed in terms of sage-grouse. Restoration guidelines for some sagebrush taxa are also presented.

Citation

Rosentreter, Roger. 2005. Sagebrush identification, ecology, and palatability relative to sage-grouse. In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 3-16

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/21434