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    Author(s): Thomas A. Jones; Steven R. Larson
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 49-55
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (275 B)

    Description

    Due to the emphasis on restoration, native cool-season grass species are increasing in importance in the commercial seed trade in the Western U.S. Cultivated seed production of these native grasses has often been hampered by seed dormancy, seed shattering, and pernicious awns that are advantageous outside of cultivation. Relatively low seed yields and poor seedling establishment have also restricted their cultivation. Most are members of the Triticeae tribe. Bunchgrasses include Snake River wheatgrass (Elymus wawawaiensis), bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata), basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus), and squirreltail (E. elymoides and E. multisetus). Rhizomatous grasses include western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii), thickspike wheatgrass, and streambank wheatgrass (both E. lanceolatus), and beardless wildrye (L. triticoides). Important non-Triticeae native bunchgrasses include native bluegrasses (Poa spp.) and Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides). These grasses may be either self-pollinated, cross-pollinated, or apomictic. These mating systems are reflected in the patterns of genetic variation characteristic of these species.

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    Citation

    Jones, Thomas A.; Larson, Steven R. 2005. Status and use of important native grasses adapted to sagebrush communities. In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 49-55

    Keywords

    native grasses adapted, sagebrush communities, native cool-season grass species, Triticeae tribe

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