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    Author(s): John M. Randall
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 64-73
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (170 B)

    Description

    Nonnative invasive plants invade wilderness and other natural areas throughout North America and invasive organisms as a group are now considered the second worst threat to biodiversity, behind only habitat loss and fragmentation. In the past 10-20 years there have been upsurges in interest in the ecology of plant invasions among researchers and in concern about how to prevent and control them among land managers. Much research has focused on how to identify and predict which species are most likely to be invasive and which habitats or areas are most likely to be invaded and some progress has been made. A number of studies clearly demonstrate that plant invasions can alter ecosystem processes, displace native species, promote nonnative animals, fungi or microbes and alter the genetic make up of native species populations through hybridization. Some invasions can be prevented or controlled and efforts continue to refine and improve current techniques. Improved prevention and management of invasive plants will require development and use of adaptive management strategies, tools to help managers set weed control priorities, techniques for using remote sensing technologies to map weed infestations, improved control methods and increased attention to preventing new invasions and quickly detecting and eradicating those that do occur.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Randall, John M. 2000. Improving management of nonnative invasive plants in wilderness and other natural areas. In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 5: Wilderness ecosystems, threats, and management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-5. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 64-73

    Keywords

    Wilderness, nonnative plants, invasive plants, adaptive management

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