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    Author(s): Norman L. Christensen
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-12
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (140 B)

    Description

    Research in wilderness areas (areas with minimal human activity and of large spatial extent) formed the foundation for ecological models and theories that continue to shape our understanding how ecosystems change through time, how ecological communities are structured and how ecosystems function. By the middle of this century, large expanses of wilderness had become less common and comparative studies between undisturbed and human-dominated landscapes were more prevalent. Such studies formed the basis an evolving understanding of human impacts on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical cycling. Research in the last third of this century has repeatedly taught us that even the most remote wilderness areas are not free of human influence. Nevertheless, extensive wilderness has been and will continue to be critical to our understanding our impacts on nonwilderness landscapes.

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    Citation

    Christensen, Norman L., Jr. 2000. The evolving role of science in wilderness to our understanding of ecosystems and landscapes. In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-12

    Keywords

    wilderness, science, research, ecosystems, landscapes, resource management, human impacts

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